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June 14, 2009

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» Iran, Twitter & Media Supply/Demand from One Man and His Blog
A couple of people have asked me what I think of the #cnnfail situation, with live Twittering from Iran exposing the conflict there, but the major news networks not starting to cover it until hours later. I haven't really felt... [Read More]

Comments

George

I agree with Chris above. It was definitely discouraging to see the rumours and try to separate them from fact. But, it was encouraging to see so many people coming together for a single cause no matter where they were in the world. You have to love a tool that alows that! http://www.fullmediafire.com

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May be it's like myspace: nobody will use twitter in 5 years !

Anna

It was a really pivotal moment in the history of 'news reporting' - when people overtook 'the establishment' and provided the real news. http://www.rapidskunk.com

Tim Scott

I agree wih you big time on this one. I hear alot of news first on Facebook and Twitter before it even hits the papers, radio, or even tv. The problem is that with social media is almost like that game we all played in elementary school. Where we all stood in a line, and on one end a kid whispered something into the ear of the person in front on them, etc... Well by the time that word or phrase got to the end of the line, it was something completely different. But thats wha happens when there is no filter.

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It was a really pivotal moment in the history of 'news reporting' - when people overtook 'the establishment' and provided the real news.

Sean (@SeanMalarkey)

I agree with Chris above. It was definitely discouraging to see the rumours and try to separate them from fact. But, it was encouraging to see so many people coming together for a single cause no matter where they were in the world. You have to love a tool that alows that!

Phil Chetwynd, AFP Asia Editor, @philchet

Many thanks for this excellent and clear-headed analysis. We have been sharing your thoughts among senior editors at AFP over the past few weeks as we all grapple with trying to filter the Twitter noise. The debate has kicked off again after Michael Jackson, although for me that story was more about old media using new platforms. It is hardly surprising TMZ broke the story as they have more reporters and sources covering Hollywood than any other news organisation. The scoop was disseminated by Twitter et al, but it was old fashioned journalism that broke the story

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I agree with you, the twitter experience brought lots of rumors, unconfirmed data that was later confirmed or not, no headlines, etc...
RAW DATA, as is comes when things are happening, with its usual chaos and seemingly absence of direction...

Richard S

I completely agree with the point about engagement. Twitter is closer to live conversation than passively consuming news or even reading blogs as noticeboards and pinning up comments. And deeper engagement in world events must be a good thing.

Maria Lavis

I also watched the events unfold via twitter, and it was ahead of the news curve, but it also involved sorting through reams of posts/data as you mentioned. Much of the #iranelection stream did become choked with superfluous commentary, but the value to me in that was the show of interest and support for people in need and international news.

What was really helpful were rational, reasonable people who filtered the feed to reliable sources, as well as cross referenecing reports to other reports saying same or conflicting thing.

It seems that twitter has something of value to add to the news process indeed.

@marialavis (On Twitter)

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